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Charles Shifflett Acoustic Guitars

- "Django Jazz" Guitars -

Django Reinhardt
Django Reinhardt was an outstanding gypsy jazz guitarist who, in the 1930's & 40's, played with a group called "The Quintet of the Hot Club of France". He (and others in the band) used a number of guitars sold by the Selmer Co., (France) but made in cooperation with the guitarist and inventor, Mario Maccaferri. They were louder acoustically than other guitars, with a distinctive tone that cut through the band, making them unparalleled as soloing instruments in the genre. (Unfortunately only a few hundred guitars were made before Maccaferri and Selmer parted ways.)
"Django Jazz" Guitar

Some of the "Selmer/Maccaferri" guitars had an internal sound box and a reflector at the sound hole. These instruments had exceptional power in the treble, but the soundbox instruments I've heard were weak in the bass. While I can build the soundbox option, most players today seem to expect more balance. Actually even without the sound box, they still have plenty of treble and are still among the loudest acoustic guitars I've ever heard!

Fortunately for me, Django's unique style and Mario's unique guitars are a passion for the master I studied under. I learned from Michael Dunn how he builds his variations of "Selmer & Maccaferri style" guitars and have developed my own variations. This style of guitar has such power that, as well as the full size guitar, I'm also making a model that has a 3/4 size body (standard scale length though), and it is really loud! (Although it does have 14 frets clear, its photo is in the "parlour guitars" section to keep the other little ones company.)

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a great "Django" Site
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email: cshifflett@melmusic.com
last update last update Sept. 15, 2005